Penguins Stopped Play by Harry Thompson: A Review

pspPenguins Stopped Play

Harry Thompson

Six Word Summary: 11 washouts take on world, lose.

I rate it 8.5/10

Growing up without an interest in cricket in India has to be very similar to growing up as an atheist in the bible belt: you have a lot more free time because you don’t spend hours attending meaningless rituals. And you get heckled a LOT in the playground. Like, really a lot. People call you names and push you, till you begin spending recess time in the library.

Despite all the explicit peer pressure, I never took to cricket. Grown men in flannel fancy-dress languidly chasing a ball and taking themselves way too seriously failed to appeal to either my sense of absurdity or my sense of realism.

Strangely, the peer pressure has not declined in my adult years, and perhaps because I’m growing more tolerant, I have begun giving in more often. I was dragged out by friends to trawl the roads of Hyderabad at midnight when India  won the World Cup in 2011. I have been coerced to write this mockumentary style (almost entirely fictional) article about Stephen King’s cricket connection. I am often bullied into taking cricket quizzes which calculate how much I know about fast bowlers (absolutely nothing) and which Indian cricketer I actually am (Virender Sehwag). And sometimes I am given cricket book recommendations, which I generally manage to duck (hee). Except this once, when I read Penguins Stopped Play (admittedly, I had asked for a recommendation this time.)

Harry Thompson, despite his love of playing, was such a mediocre player that he was perpetually left out of his school and college teams. Frustrated by the lack of opportunity to play cricket, he and his friends formed a team of their own, named it after history’s most tragic runner-up, Captain Robert F. Scott, and began challenging various village and school teams to play. Captain Scott XI, unfortunately, absorbed its philosophy from its eponym and deemed it far more honourable to lose than to try to win, with the result that most teams refused to have anything to do with such willfully feeble opponents after the first game. Nonetheless, the team thrived and grew, but with the inclusion of fresh blood, cracks began to develop. The new players were just as rubbish as the original ones, but they, especially the ones from the colonies, actually thought it was worthwhile and fun to try and win. That is a very basic difference in ethics, and expectedly, after a bout of mutual petty sabotage and bitterness, the team split; Harry Thompson continued to skipper the fighting team while the layabouts went their own way. Continue reading

The Heat and Dust Project by Devapriya Roy and Saurav Jha: A Review

51xWhJizcXL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_The Heat and Dust Project

Devapriya Roy and Saurav Jha

Six word summary: Hot. Dusty. Wonderlusty. Cheap hotels=crusty.

The Heat and Dust project has been raising quite a bit of dust (though thankfully not heat) in the Indian biblio circles this year. The reason is obvious. We read often, usually in the weekend colour supplements of our newspapers, about MBAs and corporate sharks chucking their worlds of security and social comfort to take the plunge into something crazy, something that could possibly ruin them, something they have dreamed of all their lives. No less frequent are the Kerouc/Ginsberg styled grass-fueled poets who make their way across the vastness of India, free from financial concerns and (I presume) baths. However, how frequently have you heard about a normal, middle-class working couple who decide to take an indefinite break from their careers and go backpacking through the country on a shoestring budget? People are intrigued, and with good reason. Continue reading

110 Random Observations Made While Re-reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Part 2)

This is the  second part of the fourth post on the Harry Potter Re-read Project. The first was published here ,the second here, and the third here. Be sure, also, to read Part 1 here.

What I’m doing here is making a record of random thoughts that popped into my mind while reading each book. It’s not a list of loopholes, or a list of questions, or a list of FTW moments, or WTF moments either, though it has a bit of everything. It’s just a random list that I randomly made.

 Please note that this post, unlike the earlier ones, contains some text that could be considered NSFW (that is, if you read in very enhanced font and you have prudish colleagues who tend to rubberneck at your screen). But that should not bother you, dear Potthead. Harry and his friends are growing up, Hogwarts is sloshing with hormones, days are getting darker and more sinister. You and I cannot go on being children now.

51. I think the depiction of house elves in this universe is mirroring the speech pattern of people of African origins in the days of slavery (primarily in the use of double negatives to imply negative). But it bears thinking, are house elves really enslaved creatures, or is it in their special nature to serve humans, and Dobby is just a freak? He is certainly treated as a freak by the other elves, and even he seems to want to keep a low profile on his thirst for freedom.

52.

‘ Can I have a look at Uranus too, Lavender?’

A. Mukherjee points out that it took Lavender two years to accede to this request.

53.

‘…”The Yule Ball is of course a chance for us all to – er – let our hair down,” she said, in a disapproving voice.’

Professor McGonagall’s  apparent disapproval is both endearing and in character, but we have seen her getting tipsy before at Christmas, breaking into blushes and giggles at a kiss from Hagrid.

54.

‘He found it hard to concentrate on Snape’s Potions test, and consequently forgot to add the key ingredient — a bezoar — meaning that he received bottom marks.’

Two years down the line, forgetting a bezoar would have meant a far more serious loss in Harry’s life, but fortunately he remembers.

55. If Parvati and Padma are the ‘best looking girls in the year’, how come they are the last to find dates for the ball? Continue reading

110 Random Observations Made While Re-reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Part 1)

This is the  first part of the fourth post on the Harry Potter Re-read Project. The first was published here, the second here, and the third here. Be sure, also, to read Part 2 here.
What I’m doing here is making a record of random thoughts that popped into my mind while reading each book. It’s not a list of loopholes, or a list of questions, or a list of FTW moments, or WTF moments either, though it has a bit of everything. It’s just a random list that I randomly made.
 Please note that this post, unlike the earlier ones, contains some text that could be considered NSFW (that is, if you read in very large font and you have prudish colleagues who tend to rubberneck at your screen). But that should not bother you, dear Potthead. Harry and his friends are growing up, Hogwarts is sloshing with hormones, days are getting darker and more sinister. You and I cannot go on being children now.

1. Goblet of Fire is not, in my opinion, one of the best books in the series, because of the massive plot holes I’ll touch upon. However, it IS the most fun book, primarily because of the suspension of ordinary school curriculum, and the fact that everybody’s hormones start kicking in. Also, dragons.

2. Cover art conclusions by a first time reader: Harry is fighting dragons! And stealing eggs! Probably to fill up some goblet with fire.

cover 4
3. Cover spoiler: As soon as the reader finds out what the first task will be, they can guess how Harry will play it, thus rendering pages of suspense useless.

4. The book starts with the first Voldemort dream that Harry has. However, strangely, Harry sees the dream not from the PoV of Voldemort or his snake, but from a detached PoV. A later dream in this book will have him share the PoV of an owl. Could this be because the Dark Lord has not yet assumed a body? Continue reading

57 Random Observations Made While Re-reading Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

This is the third post on the Harry Potter Re-read Project. The first was published here and the second here,  and the fourth here.

What I’m doing here is making a record of random thoughts that popped into my mind while reading each book. It’s not a list of loopholes, or a list of questions, or a list of FTW moments, or WTF moments either, though it has a bit of everything. It’s just a random list that I randomly made.

1. Prisoner of Azkaban is my second favorite book in the series. I just love how neat it is. There are a lot of threads waving about, but Rowling manages to weave them all in very expertly.

2. Cover art conclusions by a first time reader: Harry has a pet albino reindeer! And it helps him fight vampires!

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

3. Owls must be tremendously magical creatures in this universe. Hedwig not only knows it is Harry’s birthday in a few days, she is also aware that Hermione is not in the country and wouldn’t be able to send his gift, is able to locate her and pick up the gift, meets up with Errol and the Hogwarts owl, and ensures that for once, Harry gets presents on his birthday.

4. Aunt Marge is a terrible person. Unlike the Durseleys, who actually have been inconvenienced by Harry’s appearance in their lives, Marge just seems to enjoy tormenting Harry on principle, because she likes kicking out at defenceless people. Also, she drowns puppies. That may be necessary for a dog breeder, but does tell you about her personality that she enjoys taking weak newborn puppies out of their litter and putting them to death.

Also, could Marge, with her mannish appearance, her overabundance of dogs, and her near-moustache, be a stereotypical closeted butch lesbian?

5. Ron’s second wand, interestingly, has the same core as his first- unicorn hair. Continue reading

Daffodils

A fan fiction

Beyond the village was a ruined old church that nobody went to any more. Right behind the churchyard, hidden from the paved road, was an overgrown acre that had once, the villagers knew, been a graveyard, but now did not look as if anybody, living or dead, had entered it in decades. Even the most adventurous children gave it a wide berth; lovers found other places to be amorous. This is why there was nobody to disturb the young woman who sat there on an autumn afternoon, her head resting on a mossy mound, her body racked with sobs.

The woman had white-blond hair that streamed down her back; something about her, perhaps the haunted look in her eyes, perhaps the way she shivered occasionally, suggested a drowning person. She was beautiful, despite the red rims of her eyes that stood out from her pallor. She wore a wedding ring, a massive white diamond set against emeralds, and on her wrist, she wore a man’s watch, incongruous with her sophisticated, feminine attire in its size and its decrepitude.

The sun had already started going orange when she finally raised her head from the white sepulchre, her eyes dry, her face almost bloodless. She traced her fingers on one of the two names carved into the marble, and read aloud the words beneath the names.

“The righteous are bold as a lion.” Continue reading

28 Random Observations Made While Re-reading Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

This is the second post on the Harry Potter Re-read Project. The first was published here, the third here,  and the fourth here..

What I’m doing here is making a record of random thoughts that popped into my mind while reading each book. It’s not a list of loopholes, or a list of questions, or a list of FTW moments, or WTF moments either, though it has a bit of everything. It’s just a random list that I randomly made.

1. Cover art conclusions by a first time reader: Whoa! Harry is being attacked by a giant mutant parrot-hawk hybrid! Thank god an enormous snake is trying to rescue him while weeping blood. Also, is that Hermione napping in a corner, or did mutant-parrot peck her to death? And Harry seems to have given up his wand for Hagrid’s sword, but it doesn’t seem like he knows what to do with something that big.

harry-potter-chamber-of-secrets-childrens-uk

2. While we’re on cover art, way to give away the climax, designers. Now fresh readers will not only figure out exactly what Slytherin’s monster probably is, since  Fawkes appears early on in the book, they will know exactly how Harry beats the monster. Continue reading

58 Agatha Christie Book Titles Translated into Hindi

For the last couple of days, I have been really bothered about the fact that, while Agatha Christie’s novels are available in Hindi, they have skipped translating the titles. See for yourself:

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This indolence on the part of the publishers has caused me much anguish, so I spent a whole afternoon translating 58 Agatha Christie titles to Hindi. I was aided in this noble cause by fellow crime-fighter Abhishek Mukherjee. I have marked all the translations done by him in the list below with his initials, and many of the others are a result of the banter we were carrying on.

I doubt Harper Hindi will pay us in money or attention for the effort that we have put in. But that’s us: selfless, untiring righters of wrongs for the betterment of society and literature.

Let me know if you can think of a better translation for any of the titles in the list, and I’ll add yours with full credit.

The Mysterious Affair at Styles                     : Satishgarh Mein Gadbad

The Murder on the Links                                  : Pitch Ke Beech Hatya Continue reading

20 Random Observations Made While Re-reading Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

 Let it be known, I have read each Harry Potter book at least 25 times. But not in the last five years since I left home.  I left my set in my parents’ library, for the benefit of my brother and younger cousins, at least one of whom is a Potthead thanks to my burst of magnanimity. But needless to say, I missed my books, and tried to compensate by participating in every HP quiz or discussion I came across.

On my birthday this year, my husband gifted me a handsome box set. Sadly, we couldn’t find the original Bloomsbury covers anywhere, but these are very pretty too. As is the box, which has a watercolor of Hogwarts on the back.

I’m not reviewing the Harry Potter series. I’m pretty sure I don’t need to. If you haven’t read it yet, please carry on, nothing to see here.

What I’m doing here is making a record of random thoughts that popped into my mind while reading each book. It’s not a list of loopholes, or a list of questions, or a list of FTW moments, or WTF moments either. It’s just a random list that I randomly made.

The second part of this series has been published here, the third here, and the fourth here. Continue reading

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins: A Review

BOOK Book Reviews 11514819042The Girl on the Train

Paula Hawkins

I rate it: 9/10

Six Word Summary: Curiosity- it doesn’t kill just cats.

Every morning, a train from the suburbs to London makes an unscheduled stop at a faulty signal. Every morning, a girl on that train peers out of her window to look at the houses on the embankment, specifically one house with a couple. In the girl’s mind, the man is called Jason and he’s a doctor with the UN. The woman is Jess and she is an artist. They are beautiful, and perfect for each other, and totally in love, and their lives are everything the girl’s isn’t. Complete, meaningful, purposeful.

Then one morning, the girl on the train sees something in Jason and Jess’s house that leaves her dumbfounded, and suddenly finds that she has been ejected from her spectator’s seat straight into the heart of events. Can she help solve the ominous mystery that has somehow seeped into every nook of her empty life, or is she inviting deadly trouble for herself and everyone involved? Continue reading

যে বইটা উড়ে গেছিল

দার্জিলিং আমি প্রচুর বার গেছি। একাধিক বার গেছি নকূড়মামা ও লালিমা পাল (পুং) দের সঙ্গে…

দার্জিলিং -এ গিয়া দেখিলাম, মেঘে বৃষ্টিতে দশদিক আচ্ছন্ন। ঘরের বাহির হইতে ইচ্ছা করে না, ঘরের মধ্যে থাকিতে আরও অনিচ্ছা জন্মে।প্রাত্যকালের আহার সমাধ্য করিয়া পায়ে মোটা বূট এবং আপাদমস্তক ম্যাকিনটশ পরিয়া বেড়াইতে বাহির হইয়াছি। জনশূন্য ক্যালকাটা রোডে একাকী পদচারণ করিতে করিতে ভাবিতেছিলাম– অবলম্বনহীন মেঘরাজ্যে আর তো ভাল লাগে না… এমন সময় অনতিদূ্রে…

পরশুরাম-এ গ্র্যাজুয়েট করার আগেও দার্জিলিং গেছি আমি, টেনিদাদের পিছন পিছন…

ওগো চাঁদিনী রাতের পাইন–

ঝলমল করছে জ্যোৎস্না

দেখাচ্ছে কি ফাইন!

ঝিরঝির করে ঝরনা ঝরছে

প্রাণের ভিতর কেমন করছে

ভাবগুলো সব দাপিয়ে মরছে

ভাঙছে ছন্দের আইন–

ওগো পাইন!

কিন্তু তারও অনেক অনেক দিন আগে, আমি প্রথম দার্জিলিং গেছিলাম বুনো হাঁস -এর পিঠে চেপে। তখনও আমি বই-এর পাতায় কালো আঁচড়গুলি অনুবাদ করতে শিখিনি, শুধু তার উপর নিজের আঁচড় কাটতে শিখেছি। তখন মা, (এবং কিছুটা অংশ বাবা) আমাকে বুড়ো আংলা পড়ে শোনাত। বারংবার। বারের পর বার। মায়ের ভাষায় ‘মুখে ফ্যানা উঠে যাওয়া অবধি’। আমার হাঁস, পাহাড়, এবং ছাগলদের প্রতি ভালবাসার উতপত্তি সেখান থেকেই কিনা জানি না, তবে অসম্ভব নয়।

২০১৪ এর ডিসেম্বর-এ আমি জীবনে প্রথমবার সশরীরে দার্জিলিং গেছিলাম। খুব স্বাভাবিক ভাবেই অন্য বেশ কিছু বই এর সঙ্গে বুড়ো আংলা নেব স্থির করেছিলাম, কিন্তু ব্যাগে ঢোকাতে ভুলে যাই। তাতে অসুবিধে ছিলনা, আমি চিরকাল রিসোর্সফুল, স্টেশন থেকে এক কপি কিনে নিলা্ম। বুড়ো আংলা ছাড়া পাহাড়ে ওঠার কোনো পরিকল্পনা আমার ছিল না।

শিলিগুড়ি থেকে গাড়ি নিয়েছিলাম। আমি এমনিতে শান্ত চুপচাপ মানুষ, তার উপর ছোটবেলায় মোশন সিকনেস এ ভুগতাম, গাড়িতে বিশেষ দুরন্তপনা করছিলাম না, কিন্তু খুব বেরসিক কালাপাহাড় টাইপের লোকেরও হঠাৎ ক্ষেত-বাজার ছেড়ে ঝাউয়ের জঙ্গলে ঢুকলে গান পাবে। আমার সহযাত্রী দের মধ্যে কেউ কেউ গান ধরল। আমি দেবী-বঞ্চিত, সে চেষ্টা করলাম না, বার কয়েক ‘ওগো পাইন’ টা আবৃত্তি করলাম। প্রথম দু বারের পর অল্প কিছু আপত্তি উঠেছিল বটে কিন্তু বিশাল পর্বতমালার কোলে দাঁড়িয়ে এরকম ক্ষুদ্র নঞর্থকতা কে পাত্তা দিলাম না।

গাড়ি যখন টুং ঢুকবে, সবে বিকেল পরেছে,হাল্কা কুয়াশা, তখন আমার মনে হল, এই তো সময়।বুড়ো আংলা বার করলাম, গলা খাঁকরালাম, এবং পড়তে শুরু করলাম:

সুরেশ্বর ছেড়ে বৃষ্টি আরম্ভ হল। এতদিন রোদে কাঠ ফাটছিল। সকালে যখন হাঁসের দল যাত্রা করে বার হল তখন আকাশ বেশ পরিষ্কার, কিন্তু ব্রহ্মপুত্র নদের রাস্তা ধরে যতই তারা উত্তর-মুখে এগিয়ে চলল, ততই মেঘ আর কুয়াশা আর সঙ্গে-সঙ্গে বৃষ্টি দেখা দিলে! হাঁসের ডানায় পাহাড়ের হাওয়া লেগেছে, তারা মেঘ কাটিয়ে হু হু করে চলেছে; মাটির পাখিদের সঙ্গে রঙতামাশা করে বকতে-বকতে চলবার আর সময় নেই, তারা কেবলি টানা সুরে ডেকে চলেছে – “কোথায়, হেথায়, কোথায়, হেথায়।”

হাঁসের দলের সাড়া পেয়ে ব্রহ্মপুত্রের দুপারের কুঁকড়ো ঘাঁটিতে ঘাঁটিতে জানান দিতে শুরু করলে। পুব-পারের কুঁকড়ো হাঁকলে – “সাতনল চন্দনপুর, কোমিল্লা, আগরতলার রাজবাড়ি, টিপারা, হীলটিপারা!” পশ্চিমপারের কুঁকড়ো হাঁকলে – “ভেংচার চর”, পশ্চিমে হাঁকলে – “চর ভিন-দোর।”

হাঁসেরা তেজে চলেছে, এবার ছোট-ছোট গ্রাম, নদীর আর নাম শোনা যাচ্ছে না, বড়-বড় জায়গার কুঁকড়ো হাঁকছে – “পাবনা, রামপুরবোয়ালিয়া, বোগরা, রাজসাহি, দিনাজপুর, রংপুর, কুচবিহার, জলপাইগুড়ি, শিলিগুড়ি!” পুবের কুঁকড়ো অমনি ডেকে বললে – “খাসিয়া-পাহাড়, গারো-পাহাড়, জৈঁতিয়া-পর্বত, কামরূপ।”

এখানে বলে রাখা ভালো, আমার তিন সহযাত্রী কী এক পাতা-র কারণে কিঞ্চিত সান্দ্র ছিল, যারে বলে হাই। আমার এই আকস্মিক রসের প্লাবনে যে কোনই প্রতিবাদ ওঠেনি তা নয়, কিন্তু সেগুলো মৃদু, “এ আবার কি কচ্ছে? …থামা না মালটাকে! …খাদে ফেলে দেব কিন্তু!” গোছের শিথিল প্রতিবাদ। ওতে আমি কান দিইনি।

সোন্নাটা ছাড়িয়ে যখন ঘুম ঢুকবে, তখন গাড়ি দাঁড় করানো হল এবং ছেলেরা হিসু করতে নামল। আমিও নামলাম, এবং (একটু দূরে ) খাদের ধারে দাঁড়িয়ে আলো আঁধারে ধূসর নীল আকাশ আর ঝাউবন কে এই লাইনগুলো পড়ে শোনালাম :

 নতুন জল-বাতাস পেয়ে পৃথিবী জুড়ে সবাই রোল তুলেছে, আকাশের হাঁসেরাই বা চুপ করে থাকে কেমন করে, তারা পাহাড়ের গাঁয়ে সিঁড়ির মতো ধাপে-ধাপে আলু, পেঁয়াজ, শাক-সবজী ক্ষেতগুলোর ধার দিয়ে ডাকতে-ডাকতে চলল – “রসা-জমি ধসে পড় না, বসে থেক না, ফসল ধরাও। নতুন বীজে ফল ধরাও!”

পাগলা-ঝোরার কাছ বরাবর এসে একখানা প্রকাণ্ড মেঘ হাঁসেদের সঙ্গ নিয়ে উত্তরমুখে চলল। কলকাতার এক বাবু পাহাড়ে রাস্তায় রবারের জুতো রবারের ওয়াটারপ্রুফ পরে বিষ্টির ভয়ে নাকে-কানে গলাবন্ধ জড়িয়ে মোটা এক চুরুট টানতে-টানতে ছাতা খুলে হাঁফাতে-হাঁফাতে চড়াই ভেঙে তাড়াতাড়ি বাড়ি-মুখো হয়েছেন দেখে হাঁসেরা রঙ্গ জুড়লে…

ঠিক কখন বন্ধুটি পাশে এসে দাঁড়িয়েছে বুঝিনি, হঠাৎ একটা হ্যাঁচকা খেলাম আর দেখলাম বইটা আমার হাতে নেই। বন্ধু দু পা পিছোলো এবং একটা বিশাল প্যারাবোলায় বুড়ো আংলা কে ছুঁড়ে দিল সোজা খাদের দিকে। আমি হাঁ করে দেখলাম বইখানা উড়ছে, উড়ছে, বুনো হাঁসের মত উড়ছে, তারপর নামছে, নামছে, তারপর উপত্যকার বিরল অন্ধকারে মিলিয়ে গেল।

বইটা আমার ছোটবেলার সেই বই বা এমনকি কলকাতার বাড়ির বই হলেও কি করতাম জানি না, হয়ত কেঁদে ফেলতাম, বা পিছনে ধাওয়া করতাম, হয়ত যে ছুঁড়েছে তাকেই পাঠাতাম খুঁজে আনতে। কিন্তু এটা স্টেশন-কেনা বই, এক দিনের মোটে বন্ধুত্ব। কষ্ট যে হল না তা নয়, কিন্তু তার থেকে অনেক বেশি হল রোমাঞ্চ। বুড়ো আংলা কোথায় গিয়ে পড়ল, কে খুঁজে পাবে, কে জানে?  হয়ত কোনও ছোট্ট টয়ট্রেন স্টেশনে পড়বে, যেটার নাম হয়ত কিছুক্ষন আগেই পড়লাম। হয়ত কোনও ঝাউগাছের ডালে আটকে থাকবে, অনেক দিন পর কোনও  পাহাড়ি বাচ্চা স্কুল ফেরা পথে দেখতে পাবে, অনুসন্ধান করতে চড়বে। হয়ত একদল হাঁস ওটাকে ঘিরে শোবে, হয়ত একটা শেয়াল মুখে করে নিয়ে চলে যাবে।

হয়ত ধোঁয়ার আশীর্বাদে আমিও কিছুটা তরল ছিলাম।

দার্জিলিং-এ বুড়ো আংলা পড়া হল না আমার। তবে যে সীট টা তে বসে করুণা বন্দ্যোপাধ্যায় গান গেয়েছিলেন সেই সীট এ বসে ম্যল রোডে সদ্য কেনা টল্কীন এর অনূদিত বেওলফ পড়েছিলাম।

অবশ্যই নিঃশব্দে।

Sir Terry Pratchett, in memorium

DON’T THINK OF IT AS DYING, said Death. JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH.

Sir Terence David John "Terry" Pratchett April 28, 1948, - March 12, 2015

Sir Terence David John “Terry” Pratchett
April 28, 1948, – March 12, 2015

You made me cry real tears with laughter every time, Sir Terry. This morning, the tears are there, laughterless.

You knew how to spot the ludicrous in the solemn, the hilarious in the mundane, the ridiculous in the vulgar. You knew how to create a universe held together only by magic and hilarity. You knew how to tell a story to drive all other stories out of one’s mind.

One day, I’ll meet you on board the Great A’Tuin, and I’ll tell you just what your stories mean to me.

Till then, you will be missed. Sorely.